Video

Our gadgets video blog is updated regularly with news, opinions and analysis. Head over to Gadget Teaser if you want to see more, and visit our Gadgets Channel for even more gadgets info.



Nokia Lumia Icon

Brands keep pushing the limit on audio and video as we start to record more and more of our lives. Nokia's new has some impressive features, like four microphones to boost sound quality along with full 1080p HD, Optical Image Stabilization (OIS) and unpixelated zoom. Now we'll see if this phone can make a dent in the market share for Apple and Samsung.

Tony Fadell on the iPod, Kickstarter, Nest, Steve Jobs and more

New TVs at CES

If you thought there wasn't much more manufacturers could do with HDTV after 3D TVs basically crashed and burned, then check out this of the Top 5 TV Innovations at CES. We;re definitely seeing new features being added for "smart TVs" and also some interesting shapes to make the viewing experience more natural.

Remembering Steve Jobs and the Mac

Is This the Next Leap in Motion Technology?

For a peripheral that is somewhat overpriced, underutilized, and in general vastly inferior to the Nintendo Wii console it seemingly got most of its motivation from, the has made quite a splash in the motion based control field.

There are of course the to back this up, but the real proof of this impact is evident in the creativity this device’s impressive technology has inspired in its users. See while game developers can’t seem to make a good Kinect game that isn't a dance simulator or Wii sports rip off if their jobs depended on it, the Kinect users have managed to hack into the device to make the basic technology that runs it do some incredible things. These include the entertaining ), the sci-fi worthy (), and the practical yet cool advancements in basic human interface:

Motion controlled interface has been a dream of sorts for consumers, especially since it was popularized in the movie "." With devices like the Kinect and iPhone, we have gotten closer and closer to this goal, but have yet to fully realize it. Even the impressive demonstration in that video was marred by the fact that the movements needed to actually control the system had to be very blunt, and required full body commitment to make even the simplest of motion commands.

San Francisco based company thinks they might have the inevitable solution. Their device (called the Leap) is about the size of an iPod and works through a USB input your PC or Mac. It reads a space four cubic feet in size, and is supposed to be 200x more accurate than anything else on the market. This means accuracy to within 1/100th of a millimeter, which should allow for subtle finger movements (instead of whole hand and body motions) being able to produce the desired results.

The extraordinary video the company released seems to back that up.

We’ve been promised the moon with motion sensors before, but I have to say that given the advancements in the motion field over the past few years, I see no real reason that the Leap shouldn’t function in the way it claims to. My only real red flag in that video is the video game controller sections. I still feel that we are a ways off from total motion control in games without the use of any buttons, especially in titles designed with mouse/keyboard in mind. Of course in menu heavy titles like Real Time Strategy Games or RPG’s, I could see this device making formerly monotonous navigation somewhat enjoyable.

Even if it's not yet perfect, at a modest retail price of $70 (), many consumers might give this device a shot and find their own ways to make use of it when it's released early next year. After all, that’s the only explanation as to why the Kinect is doing so well.

The Tesla Gun: "IT'S ALIVE!!!"

Turning car windows in screens

This project from GM looks very cool, but you have to wonder how it works with safety, as drivers can't be distracted by this stuff.

Predicting PCs and the Internet . . .

OLED TV Buzz

These new TVs are :

Check out the video and see for yourself. 3D TVs were a huge bust, but now these new super-thin TVs should generate some serious buzz.

The water-powered jetpack

Short Takeoff and Landing plane can takeoff with just 10 feet

I'm not much of an aviator, but I still appreciate this insane video of a competition plane landing in just 17 feet and taking off in an alarming 10. Granted, there's a lot of wind working in the pilot's favor, but it's still pretty remarkable to see something like this in action.

The power behind Microsoft's Kinect

Paid TV execs really don't get it

I've been writing here a lot about the development of online TV services and my desire to be able to truly cut the cord and fully rely on the internet for my media consumption. I don't currently have a cable subscription of any kind, which makes me really really happy, but my system isn't perfect and could definitely stand to get a lot better.

The biggest thing standing in my way are the paid subscription services. They show up every few weeks to : “If I can watch Glee tomorrow morning and I don’t have to pay a pay TV service –- I think that’s bad." That's Dish Network's VP of Online Content Development and Strategy, Bruce Eisen. Sorry, Bruce, but you're a moron. For starters, Fox - you know, the company that broadcasts Glee - allows me to do this. Why do they do this? Because customers want it. That's what being in any sort of delivery service is all about - catering to your customers.

Somewhere along the road to present day, guys like Bruce Eisen forgot that their companies exist to deliver a product that customers , not to dictate those wants by delivering a mediocre product at a ridiculous price. Not to limit consumer access to content but to provide it. Every time a cable or satellite exec says something like this, I can hear PR firms squealing in dismay. "Bruce! You just told the customers you don't want them to have what they want! You want to bleed them dry before they can have it! These people aren't stupid!"

And there's the other problem. All these execs like to talk as though we don't understand their business, like we can't possibly understand the position Hulu has put them in. Sorry for asking you to think, Bruce. Sorry for asking you to adapt. Sorry for asking that American business men do what they were born to do. Make things. We've stopped making and become a country of consumers. Well I, for one, am done consuming and I'm ready to .

Yeah, Bruce, that's from 30 Rock. I loaded it up on Netflix just now, scrubbed forward to the part I wanted and transcribed it. Why can't you make things like this:

And less like...wait...hold on a sec. Just have to fire up the old satellite and dig through the DV-ah, fuck it. Nevermind.

How your food rots

The Photoshop photobomb tool from College Humor

If you've ever seen a Photoshop tutorial , you know the program can often look a lot like magic. Well, this video offers you a different kind of magic. The magic that allows you to photobomb your friends and family with ease. If you don't know, photobombing is the practice of ruining a photo by appearing in the background, typically doing something distracting. As you can guess, that often means something crude, so this isn't quite safe for work, unless, like me, you work from home.

You can follow us on Twitter and Facebook for content updates. Also, sign up for our email list for weekly updates and check us out on Google+ as well.

Around the Web